John Carey
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Reviews I have written recently, appearing in the Sunday Times.

The Reinvention of Humanity by Charles King review - Margaret Mead and the birth of anthropology: The early female anthropologists who redefined our assumptions about race, gender and sexuality  (17 November 2019)

Down in the Valley by Laurie Lee review - the world of Cider with Rosie: Previously unpublished scripts by Laurie Lee take us back to the village and harsh life that inspired his most famous novel  (10 November 2019)

The Man in the Red Coat by Julian Barnes review - when Paris was at its peak: Julian Barnes immerses himself in the belle époque and the colourful life of the free-thinking surgeon Samuel Pozzi  (27 October 2019)

The Land of the White Horse by David Miles review - the mysteries of the Uffington chalk figure revealed: The origins of the Uffington White Horse are explored in an intriguing book  (29 September 2019)

The Europeans by Orlando Figes review - love among the artists: Europe’s dynamic culture comes to life in the tumultuous story of singer Pauline Viardot, her husband, and her lover, Turgenev  (22 September 2019)

Lost Girls by DJ Taylor review - the lives of four spirited women and their literary lovers: An inspired study of mid-20th-century literary life through love and sex  (18 August 2019)

Harvest by Edward Posnett - spinning gold from nature: Eider down, bird’s nest soup, coats of vicuna - how money is made from the most precious products  (4 August 2019)

The Garden Jungle: Or Gardening to Save the Planet by Dave Goulson - time to dig up your lawn and eat roadkill: A biology professor leads by example in his look at what gardeners can do to try to help save the planet  (14 July 2019)

On Chapel Sands by Laura Cumming - a modern masterpiece of a memoir: Cumming’s tale of pictures, secrets and the strange disappearance of her mother is an outstanding achievement  (16 June 2019)

Witcraft by Jonathan Rée - do the English have a genius for philosophy?: A vast study celebrates philosophy in English, from the Pilgrims on  (9 June 2019)

The Ministry of Truth by Dorian Lynskey review - why 1984 is not as good as Animal Farm: A fascinating study of one of the most influential novels of the 20th century  (19 May 2019)

L.E.L. by Lucasta Miller - the scandalous life, and puzzling end, of ‘the female Byron’: A gripping piece of detective work that scrutinises the mysterious death of the risqué 19th-century poet known as L.E.L. (12 May 2019)

Underland by Robert Macfarlane — has the cult writer taken a wrong turn in this book about caves and tunnels?: The much-admired writer strays off track in his descent into Earth’s underworlds (5 May 2019)

Beyond the Thirty-Nine Steps by Ursula Buchan: John Buchan was so much more than just a thriller writer: From lowly beginnings to lunch with the King, the incident-packed life of the Scottish author (7 April 2019)

The Forager’s Calendar: A Seasonal Guide to Nature’s Wild Harvests by John Wright: How to find food for free from buckthorn to beech leaves: an engaging guide for foragers (17 March 2019)

Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Teach Us About Ourselves by Frans de Waal: Gestures and facial expressions show that animals have an emotional life as rich as ours, argues this combative book (3 March 2019)

Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus by Fiona MacCarthy: Walter Gropius’s Bauhaus was a vision of the future inspired by the medieval past (24 February 2019)

Henrik Ibsen: The Man and the Mask by Ivo de Figueiredo — a bully who set out to shock: Ibsen’s great tragedies are more like tabloid journalism, says a new biography (10 February 2019)

A Scribbler in Soho: A Celebration of Auberon Waugh by Naim Attallah — courteous in person, poisonous in print: A celebration of the splenetic writer and Private Eye stalwart Auberon Waugh (13 January 2019)

The Royal Society: And the Invention of Modern Science by Adrian Tinniswood — snobbery and science: In its early days, the Royal Society let in aristocrats with no scientific knowledge (6 January 2019)

Ruskin and His Contemporaries by Robert Hewison — how the great critic shaped modern culture and politics: This bicentennial study of John Ruskin will be hard to beat (9 December 2018)

The Brief Life of Flowers by Fiona Stafford — blossoming with significance: From daisies and cowslips to rare ghost orchids, a glowing account of the myths and meanings we impose on flowers (11 November 2018)